Scrambles … August 11th, 2020

Jonathots Daily Blog

(4491)

Take a few minutes and unscramble this week’s inspirational thought from the words provided:

 

 

class

we

a

could

president.

back

for

Maybe

voting

go

 

P. S.  Find the unscrambled answer in today’s jonathotsjr.com

Sensitize … August 11th, 2020

SENSITIZE 74

Every morning, Mr. Cring takes a personal moment with his friends.

Today: Speaking of my brain–how did this get in? Do I want to keep it?

Click the picture below to see the video

1 Thing That Is Certain … August 10th, 2020

Jonathots Daily Blog

(4490)

Uncertainty

I feel people are frustrated and confused simply because they are not told the truth.

We have never made the planet safer by insisting that people are better than they really are.

On the other hand, we have propagated arrogance, which has led to belief in super-races, chosen people or exceptional countries that end up damaging the lives of those around them.

I have found it very comforting to understand how life works, and rather than doing commentary on how unfair it is, standing in awe of how fair the unfairness ends up being.

Please join me in the cosmic notion of uncertainty.

Life is:

1. You don’t own it, but it is in your name.

2. You don’t control it, but the steering is your job.

3. You can’t demand help, but also can’t complain.

Now, if you’re completely uncomfortable with these three stipulations, you have probably just tracked down the source of drama in your life.

But if you do comprehend them—or at least snicker—you’re on the road to understanding something very important:

There may not be a road at all.

Sensitize … August 10th, 2020

SENSITIZE 73

Every morning, Mr. Cring takes a personal moment with his friends.

Today: The goal in life is for us to “heat up” our own 3 square feet. 

Click the picture below to see the video

Things I Learned from R. B. … August 9th, 2020

Jonathots Daily Blog

(4489)

Episode 27

I had never seen the house I rented for R. B. and the single mom with her kids, until one day she called and invited me over. I had refrained from interfering in their arrangement, allowing them to influence their own situation.

But she called me, upset because the house was stinking. She was positive it was coming from the upstairs and R. B.

She was caring—she did realize that he was sick, and that hygiene was not high on his concerns. But her children were complaining, and she felt it was her duty to let me know.

I told her I would be over in the early afternoon, and to let R. B. know of my visit.

Hanging up, I took a good fifteen minutes thinking about what I wanted to do—or maybe not do—upon arriving at the house.

I formulated a plan. I decided to pass on a tour of the downstairs, patted the children on their heads and headed up the narrow staircase to R. B.’s domain.

Rounding to the top, a bit winded because of the steepness of the climb, I looked over in the corner, and there he was, sleeping peacefully on a twin bed with no sheets.

Blessedly for me, Jan and Dollie had come along to assist. Immediately upon reaching the top and looking around, they launched into cleaning. Dollie took dirty clothes and Jan tackled the bathroom, which was speckled from the floor to the walls with what looked like dried human shit.

I decided to work on R. B.

I woke him from his nap, walked him over to a chair, sat him down, got myself a basin of warm water with shampoo, tilted his head back, moistened his hair and began to scrub.

I had never washed anyone’s hair before. His locks were so filthy that it took three pans of water to get them clean. I had no idea what I was washing out of his hair.

I just talked quietly into his ear—about old times, old songs and old promises.

He settled in, totally relaxed, as if it was merely an appointment with a caretaker, performed weekly.

After the washing was done, I grabbed a hair dryer and attempted to carefully brush out all the tangles. He had a huge head of graying strands, knotted, twisted, almost seeming to have no path to straightening.

I just took my time.

I felt silly. I felt pretentious.

But for the most part, I calmed those feelings and stayed focused on him.

It took about an hour and a half to gather the dirty clothes, clean the bathroom and wash R. B.’s hair. When it was done, the room smelled better, his hair was clean, and he was so at peace he had fallen asleep.

Knowing that I couldn’t leave him in the chair, I stirred him just enough to walk him over to his bed.

As I laid him down to sleep, Janet and Dollie brought a clean sheet and a blanket to tuck him in.

I stood over him and just looked at who he was.

I wanted to pray but I didn’t know what to pray. I didn’t know what to say.

The three of us stood quietly, side by side, as if at rigid attention.

Finally, I just proclaimed, “Amen”—to no prayer.

We turned and came down the stairs. The lady of the house continued to explain to us why she had called in the first place—how much she appreciated the assistance and how they all loved R. B.

I just nodded. It seemed ridiculous to me to criticize her for not doing what was painful for me to accomplish.

I didn’t want to wash dried food and shit out of his hair. I didn’t feel noble doing it.

I just felt like it was the only thing available for me to contribute.

Sensitize … August 9th, 2020

SENSITIZE 72

Every morning, Mr. Cring takes a personal moment with his friends.

Today: Don’t trust your own thinking–you’ll end up thoughtless. Cring explains how it works.

Click the picture below to see the video

Published in: on August 9, 2020 at 1:22 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Cracked 5 … August 8th, 2020

Jonathots Daily Blog

(4488)

Cracked 5

Names Used by the Amish When Referring to the Female Vagina

 

1. Grassy Knoll

 

2.  Muffin

 

3. Barn Raiser

 

4. Vag-ta-ble

 

5. Fertilla

 

 

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