1 Thing You Can Do This Week (to Improve Your Chances)


Don’t Drop Your Anchor Until You’re Catching Fish

When I was a kid my dad took me out fishing in our very small boat. There was a motor on the back, so for a while we trolled, but when we hit a spot where we had some strikes and caught some fish, he stopped the boat and dropped the anchor.

We did not drive around the lake dropping the anchor a dozen times hoping for the best. The purpose for dropping the anchor was made manifest by catching fish.

You may think you know what you want.

You may have a five-year goal plan.

You may have already purchased the materials for your project.

But if all of that organization has failed to bring forth any “fish,” then now is not the time to settle in, commit, get a mortgage or invest money into your dream.

Wait until you start catching fish before you drop your anchor. Then don’t lift your anchor and depart until the fish have ceased to hit your hooks.

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Three Ways to Find an Answer … June 4th, 2015

Jonathots Daily Blog

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cluttered graph

To question is to care.

Undoubtedly.

But if you establish a heart that is inquisitive, you also must be prepared for answers to begin to come your way.

Unfortunately, there’s a climate in our society that views doubt and cynicism as a sign of intelligence, and produces questions, assuming that there are no answers or all answers have been provided.

Are you really looking for answers, or do you just want to continue to form what you view as intelligent questions?

I’m not so certain we can continue to prosper as a society if we believe that maturity equals pessimism. So how can you find answers?

1. Don’t listen to statistics.

I know that will be hard. News organizations are based on them.

But don’t ever forget what the purpose is for offering statistics: it is a way of telling you that you don’t need to seek further for information, because “here is the data, and it’s already pre-determined.”

I don’t care what percentage of the American people are for or against anything. I want to know the history of the situation, the humanity involved and the hope for betterment. Once I understand the history, the humanity and the hope, I can let you know my heart.

Don’t listen to statistics. They are trumped-up numbers passed along as facts by people who have an agenda.

2. Hang with people who believe.

I’m not just talking about religion. I’m talking about folks who still believe in other human beings, who believe in possibilities, who still want to multiply their talents, and who still think that every new sunrise provides an additional opportunity.

3. Look for daily progress.

Yes, as soon as you can, get off of the five-year goal plan, the one-year lease, the monthly budget and the weekly planning session.

Life happens in 24-hour periods, and if you don’t believe that’s true, understand that somewhere within that 24 hours, we actually lay down and pretend we’re dead.

So is life a 75-year journey? Or is it basically pursued about 75 seconds at a time?

If you look for daily progress, you will begin to notice the movement of the caterpillar instead of only being impressed with the soaring of the eagle.

It will make you a more powerful person.

So in a world filled with questions:

  • Stand out from the crowd by looking for answers.
  • Ignore the statistics provided
  • Get yourself around people who believe in something
  • And put yourself on a daily regimen of interaction with the world around you.

 

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Jesonian: Carpenter Logic… August 31, 2014

Jonathots Daily Blog

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carpenter's tools

Janice has a five-year goal spectrum which she has laid out, printed and shares with anyone who’s interested and quite a few who truly aren’t. Unfortunately, five minutes after Janice shared her sixty-month roll-out, she discovered that her mother had just passed away from cancer and that her services would be needed to assist her father in finding a new place of residence. Unable to muster the kind of logical profile to continue her dreams, she abandoned them in frustration.

Mark has a business plan and has filed corporation papers to start a company to pursue one of his adventures. In the process of gaining investors, he uncovered some unsavory facts about his helpers and was forced to walk away from the money because he wasn’t sure how to logically handle the adversity.

Even though planning is a terrific way of proving to yourself and others that you are serious about your aspirations, what really determines our success is the path of logic which we pursue when our “best-laid plans of mice and men” go ker-plunk, ker-plop.

It is unfortunate that religious people don’t study the life of Jesus. They would see that he spent thirty years as a carpenter’s son and only three years concentrating on his sonship with God. So the logic of the carpenter permeated his dealings and helped him get through many a tight spot and tribulation.

What was his carpenter’s logic?

1. What’s the job?

A powerful question. Because oftentimes we prepare for a job we have created in our minds rather than dealing with the actual task set before us. When we ask ourselves, “what’s the job?” we have time to get focused on the moment instead of finding ourselves discussing logos to adorn our five-year goal plan.

2. What materials are needed?

Even though we may be familiar with the old street phrase, “don’t show up to a gun fight with a knife,” there is great depth of wisdom hidden beneath that dark thought. Knowing what materials you will need in order to pursue your situation and keeping yourself flexible for changes and revisions proves that you have the kind of logic to get you through tight times.

3. How much?

Yes–count the cost. And then, if you’re smart, ask yourself the question of what happens if the budget doubles.

4. How long?

Since the philosophy of the carpenter was “he that endures to the end shall be saved.” what might be some of the obvious and tell-tale signs of where and when the end might be?

5. Build it to last.

Even though sand is on sale, it’s not a good deal because you have to keep rebuilding. The rock might cost more, but anything that’s built on it will remain.

And when you build things to last, you not only communicate the level of your commitment, but you have an obvious passion for your work which tells people you can be trusted.

Your plans in life only work if you are following a logic which survives pettiness, stupidity, and human frailty.

 

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Always Finishing … January 14, 2013

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All Saints pic

The key is in changing your wanter.

Yes, there are things I want in life, but honestly, most of them are temporary ticklings in my soul rather than permanent inclinations. Perhaps that’s the definition of maturity–understanding that what I want right now is going to change, so instead of becoming stubborn about it I should learn to be prepared to change my wanter based upon availability.

One of the worst pieces of philosophy being propagated in our society is that we should have a dream and stick with it. What if our dream sucks? What if this vision of our future is riddled with inconsistencies, with no acknowledgment whatsoever of our factual abilities? Then we’re not dreamers–we’re just fools, waiting for the next bus to hit us as we energetically step off the curb.

I arrived at All Saints Lutheran Church in Tamarac, Florida, yesterday morning. Here is what the average person would ask me about my morning’s activities:

  1. Do you really, really, really want to be there?
  2. Is it a fulfillment of your dreams?
  3. Do you consider it a stepping stone on your way to your five-year goal plan?

You see, this is the kind of garbage they write about in self-help books. It has nothing to do with the reality of the soup in which we are stirred. So let me answer these questions as a soul who has learned the quality of changing my wanter:

1. Do I want to be there? Well, I am there and it is my next best possibility toward acting out my heart’s desire in front of a group of people who may be particlly interested in listening. It is my experience that the quick door to success is often located on the edge of a cliff. It is better to slowly, meticulously, intelligently and joyfully work with what you’ve got, change your wanter and convince yourself to do immaculate work as if you were doing it in a larger venue in front of millions of people. I did not give the congregation at All Saints Church a presentation based on the size of their particular configuration. I gave them the best that Jonathan Richard Cring had on January 13th, 2013. That’s what I deserve, that’s what they deserve and that’s what God anticipates.

2. Is this a fulfillment of my dream? My dream is to be usable. When I start trying to illustrate that dream with a picture in my mind of the ideal, I arrogantly eliminate most of the real possibilities that will come my way. If I want to be taken seriously by millions, I must faithfully finish my work in front of the ten, one hundred or one thousand sent my way. So if this all ends tomorrow, I can complete my course knowing that I put on a show that was worthy of millions in front of the audience provided.

3. About my five-year goal plan–I don’t like stepping stones. That connotes that everything is located beneath my feet instead of being embraced by my heart. Those beautiful people yesterday were not a stop-over on my way to my journey–they are my journey. Maybe in the process of the journey I will meet more. Or perhaps I will end up with fewer. But I will finish what I set out to do with the vigor, height and depth of my talent.

Sometimes when I’m on stage I close my eyes. Because I am a believer in faith, I also recognize that everything I am doing is being transported to some eternal storage facility where it will be valued. It is my treasure. I will finish it with flair. I will learn from my mis-steps. And I will change my wanter to match my “got it.”

I feel so fulfilled today because I was granted the immense opportunity to share in front of the precious souls at All Saints. After all, what can be more humbling and blessed than being allowed to proffer your limited resources in front of all the saints?

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